Category Archives: Rice

Penang Place

Penang Place 
Penang Place
6 International Business Park #01-05
Atrium Building (off Boon Lay Way)
Singapore 609918
Tel: 6899 9446
Website: http://www.penangplace.com/index.htm
Opening Hours: 11.30am to 2.00pm (lunch) and 6.30pm to 9.00pm (dinner); Closed on Sundays
 

Went to this place for lunch one fine working day and first impression simply didn’t gel with the quality of food here.

First impression was hmm… ordinary. Got the feeling that it’s a Peranakan Jack’s Place. Went round the buffet table and ok, not too bad a spread for a weekday lunch.

Being at a Penang makan place, of course I had to try the char kway teow, the Penang laksa and the chendol.  These are after all the “die die must try” dishes when you are at Penang.

And oh boy, I must say that the char kway teow here is the most authentic Penang char kway teow that I’ve eaten in Singapore. It’s truly like having the same dish at Penang. Not oily, not spicy and don’t have too much of the black sauce that you find in normal char kway teow in Singapore. One helping is never enough of this good stuff.

The Penang laksa here is good but not as tasty as the ones that they serve at Chilli Padi.  It doesn’t have the oomph that I was looking for – a bit bland and not enough of the prawn paste (heh koh).

Chendol chendol chendol – I always love the chendol that they serve in Malaysia because of the pandan jellies.  The ones that they serve in Singapore are the dark green ones and has the plastic-like look that I never liked.  The ones that they serve at Penang Place here are the same ones that they serve in Malaysia – light green and has that tinge of pandan taste.  You basically have to make your own chendol (like all buffets).  The red beans that they served here are the big ones (small kidney like), but since I am not a red beans person, I typically skipped that stuff.  I had literally 2 full bowls of the chendol – just like the ones that they serve in Penang.

Don’t try the otah at this place – it simply does not taste nice.  They attempt to make it like the Thai otah by steaming their otahs but the coconut simply overwhelms the otah.

I managed to squeeze 1 seasame chicken – I couldn’t taste much of the seasame but the chicken drumstick is crunchy on the outside and moist on the inside.

Since I am a small eater and I think I did very well by eating quite a fair bit, I wasn’t able to stuff any more of their food in.  But am happy coz I had a taste of Penang here at home. Now I don’t have to fly to Penang any more to fulfill my char kway teow/chendol cravings. Overall, great but there are hits and misses.  Just simply enjoy those that you love.  🙂

If you are not a buffet fan, they also have ala-carte dishes available, so you can always order from the menu.

Prices are reasonable –  S$19.80++ for weekday lunch and S$21.80++ for weekday dinner.  Add another S$2 if you are dining on Saturdays, Public Holidays eve nights and on Public Holidays.

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Anjappar Authentic Chenttinaad Restuarant

biryani
Anjappar Authentic Chenttinaad Restuarant
102 Syed Alwi Road
Tel: 6392 5545
76-78, Racecourse Road
Tel: 6296 5545
Website: http://www.anjappar.com.sg/

Bf and I visited the branch at Syed Alwi Road on 26 January 2009 for dinner.  They’re quite easy to find – directly opposite Mustafah Shopping Centre, along a row of shophouses.

Service was a bit slow; maybe because the place was crowded. We ordered 1 Mutton Biriyani (S$8.50), 1 paper dosa (S$3.00) and 2 cups of “masala” tea (S$2 each).

Bad choice of restaurant man! Bf’s mutton biriyani was tasteless and the mutton smell so strong that even he didn’t like it. My paper dosa was normal but I could get a cheaper one from Komala’s, with more sauce.  The tea was light with hardly masala taste.  The interesting part is that you get to mix the milk and the tea yourself (usually they serve it pre-mix).

Anyway, am not too sure if it was the tea or the dosa I had here but I had a wee bit of stomach upset the next day. Bf had no problem but we certainly won’t come back here again as the food was not tasty at all.  There’s no service charge but they charge GST on the total bill.

Mont Calzone

Mont Calzone
38 Pekin Street #01-01
Far East Square
Tel: (65) 6557 2304
Website: http://www.montcalzone.com.sg/
Opening Hours: 11.30am to 3.30pm and from 5.30pm to 10.30pm (Mondays to Fridays); 5.30pm to 10.30pm (Saturdays); closed on Sundays
 

Bf discovered this place as we were wandering around Far East Square, wondering what to have for dinner.

What caught his eye was the thin crust pizza that they had on a huge billboard outside the restaurant.  He, being an Italian foodie, wanted to try it.

On our first visit (we’ve been there two other times since), the waiter recommended the parma ham pizza (which has tomato sauce, mozzarella, parma ham topped with rucola salad and shredded parmesan).  I must say that the saltishness of the ham goes excellently well with the rucola salad and the thin crust pizza.  The crust is biscuit like and you can hear the crunch when you bite into the pizza.  Just be sure to catch the chef on a good day – he burnt the crust once.  The pizza is generously topped with the rucola salad.  At the cost of S$14.90 for an 8″ pizza (S$17.90 for 12″), it is suitable for 2 persons with small appetites to share.  Otherwise, just order a whole pizza for yourself.  I must declare that this pizza is the best value-for-money in Singapore.  Surprisingly, this is not a chef-recommended dish.

We also tried the Risotto.  Although the menu says their risotto is prepared with tomato sauce and seafood, we asked the waiter to inform the chef to prepare it with cream sauce and parmesan cheese instead.  But they served us the one with tomato sauce and parmesan cheese instead. 😦  Bf says that the tomato sauce is too heavy and masked the taste of the parmesan cheese.

We also tried the Aglio Olio but we had the chef do it in the classic style (i.e. with no shrimps but with dressing of olive oil, garlic and chilli).  I have to give this a thumbs down – the pasta turned out to be too dry and not spicy (even though we asked for spicy).  At S$12.90 a plate, portion is good for 1 person only (with small appetite).

Overall, I give the parma ham pizza 10 thumbs up for value and quality (if the chef didn’t burn my crust) but a so-so rating for the rest of the food.  But bf and I will continue visiting this place (because of the parma ham pizza) and we’ll continue to taste the other food items that they have on the menu.  I have my eye on their tiramisu already – just hope that they don’t disappoint.

Pagi Sore

Kangkong Belachan Tahu Telor Ayam Bali  Cumi Bali

Pagi Sore
Far East Square Outlet:
No 88-90 Telok Ayer Street
Far East Square
(Opp PWC Building)
Singapore 048470
Tel:  6225 6002
Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday (Closed on Public Holiday)
                         11.00 am – 3.00 pm   6.00 pm – 10.00 pm
 
Jurong Superbowl Outlet:
No 1 Yuan Ching Road #01-02

Jurong Superbowl
Singapore 618640
Tel:  6266 3200
Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday (Closed on Public Holiday)
                         11.00 am – 3.00 pm   6.00 pm – 10.00 pm
 

My parents and I visited their Far East Square outlet on Mother’s Day (11 May 2008).  Whenever we eat at an Indonesian restaurant, we never fail to order the tahu telor and the avocado dessert.  These to us are the representation of local Indonesian food.

We wanted to order the Petai Pedas but sadly they didn’t have it available.  So we ended up ordering the Kangkong Belachan (S$8.80), Tahu Telor (S$8.80), Ayam Bali (S$5.80 per piece; we ordered 2 pieces), Cumi Bali (S$13.50), 2 alpukat (S$4.20 each) and 1 chendol and of course, who can forget the rice!.

The food came pretty fast considering it was a lunch-time crowd and on top of that, Mother’s Day!  We barely had to wait for more than 15 minutes before the vegetables start arriving.

The level of spiciness in the food is indicated in their menu – 0 spoon means no chilli at all, 1 spoon means not that spicy, 2 spoons mean spicier, etc.

The first to arrive was the Kangkong Belachan.  This dish wasn’t too spicy (they only had 1 spoon) which is great coz you’ll have some people who can’t take spicy food.  Quite an ordinary dish.  I mean you really can’t go wrong with this dish unless you used really lousy belachan to fry the vegetables.

Next came the tahu telor (deep fried bean curd with egg).  Again another fail-safe dish.  The tahu (bean curd) is soft on the inside and a little bit crunchy on the outside (because of the egg).  Not spicy at all.  They poured a special sweet sauce over the tahu telor but you don’t really find it overwhelmingly sweet.  Wish they could make it a wee bit spicier so you can have the kick!

After a short while, the chicken and the squid arrived.  Both were cooked in the same style – bbq with a kind of sauce spread on top of the meat.  I find the chicken nice but it was a tad too sweet.  Too much of the sweet sauce!  Not so crunchy despite being bbq.  Tasted more fried rather than bbq.

I love the squid!  It was done just nice; you know if you overcooked the squid, it becomes too tough but this was perfect!  A bit on the sweet side but not as sweet as the chicken.  Pagi Sore also stuffed the tentacles inside the squid before bbq.  I don’t know if this made the squid a wee bit juicier but it was good.

The rice…. I love the rice too! Each portion was served wrapped in a banana leaf so that you get the nice fragrance when you unwrap the rice.  Somehow, you can never stop at just one portion.  Even small eater like me had 1.5! 😛  They charge you S$1.50 for unlimited servings of rice for each person, so if you are a huge rice eater, it’s really worth it.

The belachan… they charge you S$0.30 for each small plate of belachan so don’t be too happy and order as much belachan as you like, thinking it’s free.  The belachan is nice BUT not spicy at all!  You do get the taste of belachan but somehow, I would have much preferred it to be spicier.  No kick if it’s not spicy! However, if you love the belachan here, you can always buy it by the bottle – 230g for S$7 and 380g for S$10.

We had the alpukat (avocado dessert) which is nice but always too sweet!  Very thick and I wish they would go easy on the gula melaka (brown sugar) which makes the avocado too sweet.  Dad enjoyed his chendol – no bad comments so I guess it must be nice for him.  He has a sweet tooth so if you don’t, ask them to go easy on the sugar.

I must say that I am pretty impressed with the service here – very friendly!  Mom was even given a stalk of rose after the meal and as a Mother’s Day special, we were each given a bowl of dessert on the house.  It was a cold dessert – white fungus, wolfberry and 1 more item I can’t describe (we call it lian zhi but I can’t find the English word for it).  Nice but I liked better the one I tried before at Crystal Jade Shanghai Restaurant.

Overall, excellent service and good value for money.  We paid something like S$70 for the meal and we felt so stuffed thereafter.  Most importantly, my parents love the quality of the food.  A definitely will go again restaurant!

La Chasseur

Le Chasseur
31 New Bridge Road
Tel: 6337 7677
Opening Hours: 11am to 11pm daily

The name “Le Chasseur” brings to mind either French or Italian food but alas, you would be so disappointed when you realize it serves just home-cooked Chinese food (家常菜). 

My family and I went to this place on 4 March 2008 during lunch.  We tried the pig’s trotters in vinegar (dad’s favourite dish), stewed bitter gourd and the you tiao with sotong yesterday.  We also ordered 3 drinks and 3 bowls of rice to go with our meal and it costs us S$21.50. 

All dishes served at this eating place are in 1 standard size and the restaurant claims to have no MSG (Monosodium glutamate), no GST and no service charge. 

Dad said the pig’s trotters is not bad (although it’s not as good as Mum’s).  I am not a pig’s trotters fan, so I just basically go for the sauce.  The sauce is sourish enough (sour taste came from the vinegar) but I feel that it should be spicier (spicy taste should come from ginger and not chilli) to give it that oomph, so lacking in this dish.  This dish came with quite a few chopped up pieces of pig’s trotters in a claypot and cost S$7.50. 

The stewed bitter gourd costs us S$5.00 and came in a small bowl.  Portion was miserably little for 3 persons; but it should be ideal if you’re ordering for 1.  Taste-wise – the bitter gourd is soft but otherwise quite bland; no bitter taste of the bittergourd. 

Next, the you tiao (fried Chinese Crullers) with sotong (squid) – please, save your money for another dish.  This dish came out a bit cold.  Not only that, the you tiao was not crunchy and the sotong tasted bad.  Thumbs down for this dish! 

I ordered luo han guo (a kind of fruit – medicinal in nature) drink.  I don’t know if this drink is home made – but I’m guessing it should be because it is not sweet at all.  In fact, it was a bit bitter to the taste.  I guess all stuff that are good for your body always never tasted good.  The only good thing that we enjoyed for this lunch is the pig’s trotters. 

Next time we’re here, we’ll just stick to the pig’s trotters.  Overall prices at this eating place is a bit on the higher side – S$5 for hor fun/mee goreng, which I can easily get at S$3 elsewhere.  I also spotted a S$20 duck with salted veg soup!  Even egg omelette with tomato will set you back S$5. 

Taste-wise, they do not add MSG but I think the GST and service charges have already been included in the prices.

East Ocean Teochew Restaurant

Mixed Vegetables in Claypot Fried rice In Bamboo Fried Chicken Boiled Live Prawns from East Ocean Teochew RestaurantSeasame Ball Dessert
East Ocean Teochew Restaurant
1 Scotts Road #02-18
Shaw Centre
Tel: 6235 9088
Opening Hours: 11.30am to 3pm, 6pm to 11pm, Mon to Fri; 10am to 2.45pm, 6pm to 11pm, Sat & Sun

My bf and I had dinner here on 5 December 2007.  We were attracted by the beautiful dessert shaped like a bear (see last picture above) that I simply wanted to try.  However, when we went up to the restaurant, I was a bit disappointed to see that the beautiful dessert wasn’t on the menu.  I guessed it was only for lunch. 😦

Nonetheless, we ordered our food after mulling over the menu for quite some time. So many food, so small stomach!  Finally, we ordered the mixed vegetables in claypot (see picture 1 above), fried rice served in bamboo (see picture 2 above), fried chicken with fried garlic topping (see picture 3 above), boiled live prawns (min. 300g) (see picture 4 above).

Mixed vegetables was served in a claypot as you can see.  And it came with tang hoon (glass noodles) and assorted vegetables like cabbage, carrots, corn, etc.  Quite soupy so you can order it like a soup dish.

The fried rice served in bamboo is not the usual fried rice with char siew and peas.  This one is first fried with dried shrimps (hae bee) and then put in the bamboo to keep it warm.  Quite yummy!

Next dish was the fried chicken topped with fried garlic.  I loved this dish very much as the chicken skin was crispy and the fried garlic gave it a very nice flavour.  Excellent!

My bf’s favourite dish would of course be the boiled live prawns.  Although the prawns were merely boiled, the freshness of the prawns was enough to make this dish taste great!

At the end of your meal, you would be given 1 complimentary seasame ball for each customer.  Luckily, we cancelled our order for our dessert.

We were both too stuffed at the end of our meal.  Considering the 4 dishes we ordered, we paid less than S$100 for everything.  Quality was good and service was attentive and excellent (they cleared our dishes whenever needed and topped up our water without us asking; we were also given 8 cups of Chinese tea (I think it was tie guan ying)- 4 before meal and 4 after meal). Thumbs up!

Note: This review can also be found on TheLocalKing.

Inle Myanmar Restaurant

Inle Myanmar Restaurant Pickled Tea Leaves Salad Golden Century Egg Salad
Inle Myanmar Restaurant
#B1-07B Peninsular Plaza
Tel: 6333 5438
Website: http://www.inlemyanmar.com.sg/
Opening Hours: 11am to 10pm, daily

Peninsula Plaza, fondly hailed as Singapore’s ‘Burmese Mall’, houses not only little Myanmar stores but hides a serene Myanmar restaurant in its basement. Away from the prying eyes and heavy traffic of North Bridge Road, Inle Myanmar Restaurant is a 4-years old haven for the sizeable Myanmar community who misses home. From the ambience to the menu, Inle moulds a miniature Myanmar right in the heart of Singapore.

An appetiser of Pickled Tea Leaves Salad ($4) (see picture above) and hot Myanmar tea ($0.50) will be an excellent foray into Myanmar cuisine – a scintillating blend of sweet, sour and spicy. Myanmar tea leaves are preserved in oil and served with savoury nuts, white sesame seeds, dried shrimp, tomato slices, cabbage shreds, fresh Thai chilli and a special dressing in a salad that bursts forth with distinctively strong flavours. Pickled tea leaves are overwhelmingly salty at first taste, but become interestingly, tasty and addictive when paired with extremely crunchy nuts. The fragrance of tea leaves and sesame lingers on in your mouth until you take a draught from the steaming cup of hot Myanmar tea. Made from tea leaves roasted with rice, this drink imparts a light aroma of glutinous rice and cleanses your tongue of the salad’s taste, preparing it for the next mouthful of pickled tea leaves.

As savoury as the pickled tea leaves salad may be, you will do better with Inle’s signature Golden Century Egg Salad ($4.50) (see picture above) if you fancy sour dressings. Instead of the usual ominously black eggs we see in Chinese cuisine, Myanmar’s version surprises with a resplendent golden hue. Served with a surprisingly sour and spicy dressing, the golden century egg tastes less pungent than its ebony comrade. Wash down the starters with a glass of Inle’s fresh Tamarind Juice ($2.50), a mildly sweet drink that hides an underlying sour tinge – a guaranteed thirst quencher.

One should not miss the Moun Hin Ga ($5.50). This traditional Myanmar dish of rice noodles in fish gravy is as representative of Myanmar cuisine as laksa is of Singapore fare. Featuring the peculiar banana tree stem, this dish includes boiling tough banana tree stems slices for a full hour till it is soft and textured to the tongue. Rice noodles are heavy-laden with the goodness of the fish gravy that looks spicier than it really is, and reminiscent of Penang laksa . Inle recommends a side of Fried Gourd ($4.50) to further savour the tantalising fish gravy. Golden fried fritters hide a refreshing, green strip of marrow-long gourd, more commonly known as bu gyaw in Myanmar, complementing the fish gravy well.

Alternatively, the Fried Myanmar Tofu ($4.50) is ideal for an oily indulgence. Served with a tamarind dipping, the fried tofu triangles must be savoured hot to taste the contrast between the lightly fried skin and the creamy tofu goodness on the inside. Once you leave them to cool off, the tofu tastes bland and rather akin to sodden cotton wool. The world of difference in taste is determined within minutes, so this side should be more suited for a larger gathering (4 to 6 persons) where the otherwise delicious tofu triangles can be snapped up in a flash.

If you are someone who abhor anything fishy, the fish gravy is likely out of question for you, but settle for the Oun Nau Khau Hswe ($5.50), Inle’s curry noodles with chicken, which strangely tasted like a typical local curry chicken noodle. The yellow noodles are well-flavoured with the thick, aromatic curry gravy that tastes slightly sweet with only the slightest hint of spiciness. The chicken was, however, disappointingly drier than expected.

Forgo the chicken and enjoy the full curry goodness with Inle’s Myanmar Style Curry Pork ($5.50). Chunks of luscious pork, lined with fatty bits, are served in a dry curry that is made without the sinful coconut milk. As fat as the pork may be, the meat is well stewed and carries a full-bodied spice aroma of this lip-smacking curry.

A typical meal at Inle can be very filling but one must not leave without tasting the Hpa Lu Da . Seek solace in the comfort of vanilla ice cream, grass jelly, agar agar, sago, atap seeds, nata de coco and egg pudding in this all-time favourite Myanmar dessert. Inle hand-makes their egg pudding, a highly popular item on their menu, which carries custard-like taste with a firm texture.

Their full menu can be seen from their website.

  • If you pay using UOB Credit Card, with a minimum spending of S$30, you get 10% off your food bill.  AND if it’s your birthday month, present your I/C and get a complimentary dessert on the house.
Note: This review was extracted from StreetDirectory.com.
Post-Makan Note:

I visited this place with my family on 6 Dec 2007.  We ordered various dishes and mango salad was one of them.  If you’re really fond of Thai mango salad like we do, don’t ever order this dish as the Myanmar’s version is made up of soft mango instead of the crunchy ones we’re used to in Thai mango salad.

The curry chicken set was interesting. The curry is more like our rendang instead of the local curry dish that we’re used to. This dish is also much oilier than our rendang.

A set meal consisting of curry chicken, rice, a small bowl of soup costs less than S$7.  Add another S$1.50 if you’re ordering the set for a drink, else it’ll cost something like S$3.

They also have a dessert resembling our chendol except that it doesn’t have gula melaka and comes with 4 tiny pieces of bread.

Overall, food was nice; except that it’s oilier and dessert is sweeter than what I would like it to be.