Category Archives: Fruit Juices

Pagi Sore

Kangkong Belachan Tahu Telor Ayam Bali  Cumi Bali

Pagi Sore
Far East Square Outlet:
No 88-90 Telok Ayer Street
Far East Square
(Opp PWC Building)
Singapore 048470
Tel:  6225 6002
Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday (Closed on Public Holiday)
                         11.00 am – 3.00 pm   6.00 pm – 10.00 pm
 
Jurong Superbowl Outlet:
No 1 Yuan Ching Road #01-02

Jurong Superbowl
Singapore 618640
Tel:  6266 3200
Opening Hours: Monday to Sunday (Closed on Public Holiday)
                         11.00 am – 3.00 pm   6.00 pm – 10.00 pm
 

My parents and I visited their Far East Square outlet on Mother’s Day (11 May 2008).  Whenever we eat at an Indonesian restaurant, we never fail to order the tahu telor and the avocado dessert.  These to us are the representation of local Indonesian food.

We wanted to order the Petai Pedas but sadly they didn’t have it available.  So we ended up ordering the Kangkong Belachan (S$8.80), Tahu Telor (S$8.80), Ayam Bali (S$5.80 per piece; we ordered 2 pieces), Cumi Bali (S$13.50), 2 alpukat (S$4.20 each) and 1 chendol and of course, who can forget the rice!.

The food came pretty fast considering it was a lunch-time crowd and on top of that, Mother’s Day!  We barely had to wait for more than 15 minutes before the vegetables start arriving.

The level of spiciness in the food is indicated in their menu – 0 spoon means no chilli at all, 1 spoon means not that spicy, 2 spoons mean spicier, etc.

The first to arrive was the Kangkong Belachan.  This dish wasn’t too spicy (they only had 1 spoon) which is great coz you’ll have some people who can’t take spicy food.  Quite an ordinary dish.  I mean you really can’t go wrong with this dish unless you used really lousy belachan to fry the vegetables.

Next came the tahu telor (deep fried bean curd with egg).  Again another fail-safe dish.  The tahu (bean curd) is soft on the inside and a little bit crunchy on the outside (because of the egg).  Not spicy at all.  They poured a special sweet sauce over the tahu telor but you don’t really find it overwhelmingly sweet.  Wish they could make it a wee bit spicier so you can have the kick!

After a short while, the chicken and the squid arrived.  Both were cooked in the same style – bbq with a kind of sauce spread on top of the meat.  I find the chicken nice but it was a tad too sweet.  Too much of the sweet sauce!  Not so crunchy despite being bbq.  Tasted more fried rather than bbq.

I love the squid!  It was done just nice; you know if you overcooked the squid, it becomes too tough but this was perfect!  A bit on the sweet side but not as sweet as the chicken.  Pagi Sore also stuffed the tentacles inside the squid before bbq.  I don’t know if this made the squid a wee bit juicier but it was good.

The rice…. I love the rice too! Each portion was served wrapped in a banana leaf so that you get the nice fragrance when you unwrap the rice.  Somehow, you can never stop at just one portion.  Even small eater like me had 1.5! 😛  They charge you S$1.50 for unlimited servings of rice for each person, so if you are a huge rice eater, it’s really worth it.

The belachan… they charge you S$0.30 for each small plate of belachan so don’t be too happy and order as much belachan as you like, thinking it’s free.  The belachan is nice BUT not spicy at all!  You do get the taste of belachan but somehow, I would have much preferred it to be spicier.  No kick if it’s not spicy! However, if you love the belachan here, you can always buy it by the bottle – 230g for S$7 and 380g for S$10.

We had the alpukat (avocado dessert) which is nice but always too sweet!  Very thick and I wish they would go easy on the gula melaka (brown sugar) which makes the avocado too sweet.  Dad enjoyed his chendol – no bad comments so I guess it must be nice for him.  He has a sweet tooth so if you don’t, ask them to go easy on the sugar.

I must say that I am pretty impressed with the service here – very friendly!  Mom was even given a stalk of rose after the meal and as a Mother’s Day special, we were each given a bowl of dessert on the house.  It was a cold dessert – white fungus, wolfberry and 1 more item I can’t describe (we call it lian zhi but I can’t find the English word for it).  Nice but I liked better the one I tried before at Crystal Jade Shanghai Restaurant.

Overall, excellent service and good value for money.  We paid something like S$70 for the meal and we felt so stuffed thereafter.  Most importantly, my parents love the quality of the food.  A definitely will go again restaurant!

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Unique Fruit Juices from Tian Cheng Shen Shui Gan Zhe

Tian Cheng Shen Shui Gan Zhe
Tian Cheng Shen Shui Gan Zhe
Blk 209, Hougang Street 21 #01-22
Hougang St 21 Market and Food Centre

This is one of the stalls that sells very unique fruit juices.  Imagine having a glass of dou miao (pea shoots) combined with a bottle of yakult.  It’s supposedly good for your skin. And this glass of juice will only set you back for S$2.50!

Other unique flavours include beetroot juice (for slimming – S$2.50), bittergourd and apple (S$2), wheatgrass (S$3).  This stall also mixes potatoes and even cactus in its fruit juices! How unique can you get!

Inle Myanmar Restaurant

Inle Myanmar Restaurant Pickled Tea Leaves Salad Golden Century Egg Salad
Inle Myanmar Restaurant
#B1-07B Peninsular Plaza
Tel: 6333 5438
Website: http://www.inlemyanmar.com.sg/
Opening Hours: 11am to 10pm, daily

Peninsula Plaza, fondly hailed as Singapore’s ‘Burmese Mall’, houses not only little Myanmar stores but hides a serene Myanmar restaurant in its basement. Away from the prying eyes and heavy traffic of North Bridge Road, Inle Myanmar Restaurant is a 4-years old haven for the sizeable Myanmar community who misses home. From the ambience to the menu, Inle moulds a miniature Myanmar right in the heart of Singapore.

An appetiser of Pickled Tea Leaves Salad ($4) (see picture above) and hot Myanmar tea ($0.50) will be an excellent foray into Myanmar cuisine – a scintillating blend of sweet, sour and spicy. Myanmar tea leaves are preserved in oil and served with savoury nuts, white sesame seeds, dried shrimp, tomato slices, cabbage shreds, fresh Thai chilli and a special dressing in a salad that bursts forth with distinctively strong flavours. Pickled tea leaves are overwhelmingly salty at first taste, but become interestingly, tasty and addictive when paired with extremely crunchy nuts. The fragrance of tea leaves and sesame lingers on in your mouth until you take a draught from the steaming cup of hot Myanmar tea. Made from tea leaves roasted with rice, this drink imparts a light aroma of glutinous rice and cleanses your tongue of the salad’s taste, preparing it for the next mouthful of pickled tea leaves.

As savoury as the pickled tea leaves salad may be, you will do better with Inle’s signature Golden Century Egg Salad ($4.50) (see picture above) if you fancy sour dressings. Instead of the usual ominously black eggs we see in Chinese cuisine, Myanmar’s version surprises with a resplendent golden hue. Served with a surprisingly sour and spicy dressing, the golden century egg tastes less pungent than its ebony comrade. Wash down the starters with a glass of Inle’s fresh Tamarind Juice ($2.50), a mildly sweet drink that hides an underlying sour tinge – a guaranteed thirst quencher.

One should not miss the Moun Hin Ga ($5.50). This traditional Myanmar dish of rice noodles in fish gravy is as representative of Myanmar cuisine as laksa is of Singapore fare. Featuring the peculiar banana tree stem, this dish includes boiling tough banana tree stems slices for a full hour till it is soft and textured to the tongue. Rice noodles are heavy-laden with the goodness of the fish gravy that looks spicier than it really is, and reminiscent of Penang laksa . Inle recommends a side of Fried Gourd ($4.50) to further savour the tantalising fish gravy. Golden fried fritters hide a refreshing, green strip of marrow-long gourd, more commonly known as bu gyaw in Myanmar, complementing the fish gravy well.

Alternatively, the Fried Myanmar Tofu ($4.50) is ideal for an oily indulgence. Served with a tamarind dipping, the fried tofu triangles must be savoured hot to taste the contrast between the lightly fried skin and the creamy tofu goodness on the inside. Once you leave them to cool off, the tofu tastes bland and rather akin to sodden cotton wool. The world of difference in taste is determined within minutes, so this side should be more suited for a larger gathering (4 to 6 persons) where the otherwise delicious tofu triangles can be snapped up in a flash.

If you are someone who abhor anything fishy, the fish gravy is likely out of question for you, but settle for the Oun Nau Khau Hswe ($5.50), Inle’s curry noodles with chicken, which strangely tasted like a typical local curry chicken noodle. The yellow noodles are well-flavoured with the thick, aromatic curry gravy that tastes slightly sweet with only the slightest hint of spiciness. The chicken was, however, disappointingly drier than expected.

Forgo the chicken and enjoy the full curry goodness with Inle’s Myanmar Style Curry Pork ($5.50). Chunks of luscious pork, lined with fatty bits, are served in a dry curry that is made without the sinful coconut milk. As fat as the pork may be, the meat is well stewed and carries a full-bodied spice aroma of this lip-smacking curry.

A typical meal at Inle can be very filling but one must not leave without tasting the Hpa Lu Da . Seek solace in the comfort of vanilla ice cream, grass jelly, agar agar, sago, atap seeds, nata de coco and egg pudding in this all-time favourite Myanmar dessert. Inle hand-makes their egg pudding, a highly popular item on their menu, which carries custard-like taste with a firm texture.

Their full menu can be seen from their website.

  • If you pay using UOB Credit Card, with a minimum spending of S$30, you get 10% off your food bill.  AND if it’s your birthday month, present your I/C and get a complimentary dessert on the house.
Note: This review was extracted from StreetDirectory.com.
Post-Makan Note:

I visited this place with my family on 6 Dec 2007.  We ordered various dishes and mango salad was one of them.  If you’re really fond of Thai mango salad like we do, don’t ever order this dish as the Myanmar’s version is made up of soft mango instead of the crunchy ones we’re used to in Thai mango salad.

The curry chicken set was interesting. The curry is more like our rendang instead of the local curry dish that we’re used to. This dish is also much oilier than our rendang.

A set meal consisting of curry chicken, rice, a small bowl of soup costs less than S$7.  Add another S$1.50 if you’re ordering the set for a drink, else it’ll cost something like S$3.

They also have a dessert resembling our chendol except that it doesn’t have gula melaka and comes with 4 tiny pieces of bread.

Overall, food was nice; except that it’s oilier and dessert is sweeter than what I would like it to be.

Avocado Juice @ Alexandra Village

Mr Avocado Avocado Juice
Exotic Juice
Blk 120 Bukit Merah Lane 1 #01-19
Alexandra Village Hawker Centre
Opening Hours: 9.30am to 9.30pm; closed on Saturdays

First, the benefits of avocado are:-

  1. Avocados contain 81 micrograms of the carotenoid lutein, which some studies suggest may help maintain healthy eyes.

  2. Avocados are included in Fruits & Veggies—More MattersTM consumer educational program to promote increased consumption of fruits and vegetables for good health.

  3. Avocados contribute nearly 20 vitamins, minerals and beneficial plant compounds that can contribute to the nutrient quality of your diet.

  4. Avocados, due to their mono and polyunsaturated fat content, are a healthy substitution for foods rich in saturated fat.

  5. One-fifth of a medium avocado (1 oz) has 50 calories and contributes nearly 20 vitamins and minerals making it a good nutrient choice.

  6. Avocados contain 76 milligrams beta-sitosterol in a 3-oz serving of avocado. Beta-sitosterol is a natural plant sterol which may help maintain healthy cholesterol levels.

Precautions: Do not eat avocados or take any products containing avocados if you are using the antidepressant monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI). Avoid eating large amounts of avocado if you’d like to lose weight, because they are high in calories.

So if you’re still game for avocado shake (milk + avocado + gula melaka, otherwise known as palm sugar), then you must try it at this stall.  It’s like chocolate shake but instead of chocolate, they used avocadoes.  For a price of only S$2, you get the avocado shake like the one you see in the picture here. Real value for money if you ask me coz avocadoes cost like S$1.70 (cheapest I could ever find is S$1.20).